Mr. Selfridge: Background

Some background information on the history of departments stores from Gale Virtual Reference and my public library. Dig around your’s. What can you find?

Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition

Source: ITV Studio's Mr. Selfridge Source: ITV Studio’s Mr. Selfridge

Sharing more research from Gale’s Virtual Reference. (See if your library has this great database.)

The Department Store

The birthplace of the department store was Paris. The Bon Marché opened in 1852, soon followed by Printemps (1865) and the Samaritaine (1869). Existing shops in the United States— Stewart in New York, Wanamaker in Philadelphia and Marshall Field in Chicago—adopted the format during the 1870s. The department store brought together a series of retail methods tested out in smaller European and American shops earlier in the century, for example, the proto-department stores in industrial cities in the north of Britain (Lancaster, chapter 1). The department store proper was distinctive from previous experiments in its scale, lavishness, and resonance with the society that spawned it. The early Parisian stores were hugely influential models for subsequent stores springing up all over the world. The history of the department…

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Anatomy of a Murder

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I can’t think of a bad Jimmy Stewart movie. Director Otto Preminger’s <em>Anatomy of a Murder </em>continues Stewart’s winning streak as far as I’m concerned. With familiar old faces like Lee Remick, Ben Gazzara Orson Bean, George C. Scott, and Eve Arden, <em>Anatomy of a Murder </em> tells the story of a young soldier who’s on trial for murdering a man who allegedly raped his wife. The wife played by Remick is a saucy, flirtatious woman, who’s strangely upbeat for someone in her predicament. She calls Paul Biegler, the former D.A., who’s aimlessly spending his days fishing and doing routine legal work. She convinces him, rather easily to take the case. What follows is a game. Wherein neither Beigler nor the audience know whom to believe. While the movie’s long, and sometimes meanders like when Beigler plays piano with Duke Ellington at a roadhouse, it’s an entertaining, absorbing ride, that surprises at the very end.

I was left intrigued, as was Beigler, at the very end. The cast is strong and the story compelling.

Mr. Selfridge, Season 2, Episode 3

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In the third episode of Mr. Selfridge’s second season, Delphine Day (Polly Walker)organizes a card game with some of the influential movers and shakers she knows including Harry and Lord Loxley. It’s wonderful to see the smug Loxley lose to Harry.

People are coming to terms with the war. Agnes receives a letter from her brother George and though it’s been redacted he seems chipper. Miss Mardle takes in a Belgian refugee. She expects Florian to be a woman’s name, but it turns out that her refugee is a young man, a rather innocent and attractive Belgian. If he brings any chocolate into the house, she’ll be putty in his hands. This mix up is rather weak. Of course, Miss Mardle could arrange to have a woman live with her and someone else could take in Mr. Florian.

I’m worried about Henri who’s very mysterious this episode. His secret life remains so, to a larger extent. He’s giving lots of money to a suspicious looking man, who’s supposed to track a woman down for him. Since he’s gotten on Mr. Thackery’s bad side, Thackery follows him around town looking for dirt. Henri had best watch out. My guess is that while the problem may not be innocent it’s not as bad as it seems. Thackery expects that Henri is a German spy. Poppycock, Thackery. Poppycock.

Things are looking up for Lady Loxley as her husband’s finances are going up since he’s getting kick backs for army procurement deals. She’s been authorized to get a new wardrobe. It’s a pity that Mr. Thackery just couldn’t pick up on the newer trends. All he could show her seemed dated, though I thought the gowns were stunning, just not right for wartime.

Rose was used nicely in this episode. She saved the day as the store must employ women in the warehouse. Their garments made work nearly impossible. No one at the store really knew what to do, but Rose stepped in and figured it all out. Later when Mr. Crab organized shooting practice for store employees, Rose impressed her son Gordon with her expertise. I love seeing these new facets of hers and I’m glad to see she and Harry’s marriage is improving. Yet I do fear Daphne is up to something with Harry. She was needlessly secretive about the card game when she saw Rose.

All in all, the season’s shaping up nicely. The new characters are intriguing, though troublesome and having the mother and girls away makes the cast size more manageable for the writer. I don’t miss Miss Love at all or Harry’s philandering. While that will no doubt return, I’m glad the show isn’t all about infidelity and illicit romance. The show had a sleazier streak last season, which I’m not missing.

Ballad of Narayama

narayamaThis 1955 movie was a hard one to watch. It’s about an old woman of 70 who’s intent upon following her region’s tradition of going up the mountain to die. Spry and sharp, you’d think she’d resist like another man in her village, but no. While her son is heartbroken about having to carry his mother up the mountain to leave her to starve, her insolent grandson, who’s newly married keeps taunting her with songs about her good teeth. Repeatedly, the overgrown brat, who does no work and contributes zilch to the family, unlike his grandmother, sings about his grandmother’s “devil teeth.”

Though well done, I found myself stopping the DVD often. I watched in short spurts hoping the woman could stay with her family. But no, it would be too much of a disgrace to be alive after a great grandchild was born. The whole village would gossip.

I like to be culturally sensitive, but this test I couldn’t pass. The director clearly wanted to show how horrid it was to abandon the old in this ritualized way. How despicable the neighbor who threw his father out refusing him food since he didn’t want to go up the mountain to a slow death. Granted food was scarce and Japan was a poor country until it industrialized, but societies are judge by how they treat their weakest members. While I watched I thought of the short comings of our own system. Still this seemed so cruel. Seventy seems far too young.

Mr. Selfridge, Season 2

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Mr. Selfridge’s second season kicked off a couple weeks ago. The first episode picks up as Selfridge’s is about to celebrate its firth anniversary. Time’s flown by and it shows for some and not for others, which is odd. I was glad to see my favorite characters/actors, but the first episode was strange because the story pretty much wipes aside, or minimizes the problems Harry faced at the end of season 1 when his wife, fed up with his philandering and the public ridicule of a satirical play about Harry, left as did his best friend and most talented colleague, Henri LeClere. As if that weren’t enough, Harry’s reporter pal childishly turned on him, because he wasn’t available mmm.

I found it implausible that Harry wasn’t more affected by isolation. He’s a gregarious man who needs his social network to make him who he is. Without that energy, Harry’s nothing. He’d have hit rock bottom and then had to find new friends as well as new loves. He did find new women to replace his lover Eva Love, but Henri and Frank’s friendships were left void. I didn’t buy that that wouldn’t have left a big hole or that Selfridge would have tried to fill it. I also found it odd that Rose, Gordon and Frank all reappear at the same time. Yes, it’s the anniversary, but someone would have reconnected earlier and others might never have.

It’s just weird that in pre-WWI era Agnes, Kitty and Vincent are still single. One of them would have married. It’s odd that we don’t really know why Henri hit the skids. If J. Walter Thompson, New York didn’t work out, why not return to Chicago’s Marshall Fields, Macy’s or Paris? Why would he wind up in squalor? It’s not like he’s a gambler or drinker. I’m also surprised that Miss Mardle has chosen to stay on at Selfridge’s and work with her lover Mr. Grove as his new, young wife has baby after baby. Only a glutton for punishment would. Since she took a risk on Selfridge’s store, you’d think she’d have the pluck to get a new job.

Amanda Abbington

The second episode, where Henri seems to return for good, had a better storyline. I’m glad that Miss Mardle has come into money. We’ve got some new villians this year. Poor Lady Mae is married to a wife beater, who’s destitute. He’s cut off her funds since he has no money. It’s good to see Harry defend Lady Mae and all women against this abusive blackguard.

Rose is back and has taken up with a new friend, Miss P whom she met on the ship back to London. Rose needs a few more friends in London, but it’s just too convenient for the writers to make this one the owner of a risqué bar. Mr. Selfridge always tries to titillate in an anachronistic, implausible way.

Agnes’s character and storyline draw me it. I’m happy to see her back from Paris where she apprenticed at Galleries LaFayette. As the new head of display she’s got her hands full, particularly since the new head of fashion took an immediate dislike to her and is doing his best to sabotage her. Thank God, Harry knew that Henri would consider coming back if it were to help this damsel in distress, (whom he loved and left). Though I like Victor, I prefer to see Agnes with Henri. Most characters don’t get two fine young men to choose from. It’s an embarrassment of riches, in a way.

Good Reminder by Hank Green

Sure we know this, but we don’t really buy into the idea enough. Instead we buy into an idea that life’s an constant game of getting makeovers and new clothes. Wear what you like and spend half what you do on clothes. The rest of the cash can go into investments, experiences, etc.

Sea of Grass

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Kathryn Hepburn plays Lutie, a St. Louis woman who falls for Spencer Tracy, an older rancher named Jim. She marries him despite warnings that life on the prairie won’t be easy, nor will living with Jim may be hell. Tracy’s character is a real so and so. He drives homesteaders off government land. He owns plots that dot the area and wants his cattle to graze wherever. The town folk consider him irascible and bull headed. His cattle hands and cook seem deeply loyal. Marriage to this taciturn loner soon gets hard. While Jim occasionally gives in to Lutie’s requests, his indifference to their suffering neighbors and his schemes to keep homesteaders out, is at odds with Lutie’s beliefs. Besides there’s little for her to do and no one to talk to on the ranch. She loses her one friend due to Jim’s hard hardheartedness.

Eventually, Lutie gives in to temptation and has romantic encounter with a sympathetic lawyer who’d warned her about Jim. She gets pregnant and has a son. Her infidelity becomes public knowledge.

I liked the film as it offers a different look at life out West. The ranch is pretty comfortable and Jim gets Lutie a piano and gets the furnishings she’s used to. The challenge isn’t the tough living quarters or manual labor (Lutie does none), but rather the barren emotional life. The way infidelity and illegitimacy are handled seemed novel, even by today’s standards.

I wouldn’t say this is a “must see,” but it is compelling and held my interest. Hepburn and Tracy always do though, don’t they?