A Night to Remember

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

A Night to Remember (1958) is a disaster film with dignity. It lacks the sentimental love story, which was central to Titanic, but that’s why it’s a better film. Directed by Roy Ward Baker, the film shows the swells enjoying the high life and the boisterous fun below in steerage mixed in with the misplaced wire messages about the iceberg and the frustrating refusal of nearby ship called the California to believe the Titanic’s distress messages.

The film shows people of all sorts, some willing to help their fellow passengers and others who’ll kick and claw their way into a lifeboat. The film weaves the facts in so you don’t feel like it’s a history lecture. You root for the characters all the while knowing most won’t make it. When the boat starts tilting so much that it’s at a 45° angle, you feel dreadful.

The Criterion Collection offers a good essay on the film here.

Paprika

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Holy moly, what a film!

Paprika is another fabulous Satoshi Kon creation. It left me stunned by its mastery and left me wanting to figure out what exactly had I experienced.

I’m not a big anime fan so I don’t know much about the history or depth or breath of the art, but wow, Paprika took an art form to its limits. I never knew what to expect and while the basic story’s easy to follow, it’s till perplexing.

The story revolves around a group of psychologists who’ve developed a device called the DC mini that allows people to view another person’t dreams if they are also wearing a DC mini. Boy, I had no idea how bizarre some dreams might be. The technology gets out of the hands of its creators, who then go on a quest to protect this amazing invention, which has a purpose they realize isn’t only good.

From start to finish the film moves in and out of dream worlds that are colorful, boisterous, scary, and bizarre. Dr. Chiba, the lead female character is a very serious, very beautiful psychologist who’s often bickering with her obese, irresponsible colleague as they try to track down his assistant who’s taken the DC mini. Paprika is Chiba’s alter ego who mainly inhabits the world of dream. She’s a sexy, super girl, who rescues a cop who’s having a little existential crisis.

Yet Paprika is not a film about plot. It plays with plot and constantly twists and turns defying any expectations. It’s ultra cool and something any adventurous filmgoer should see. Once I get my VPN to work, I’ll find the trailer on YouTube and post it here.

Steve Jobs

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I knew Steve Jobs of Apple Computer fame wasn’t warm and fuzzy, but the film Steve Jobs refined my image of him. If Aaron Sorkin’s script got it right, Steve was one cold, driven man. With a superb cast including Michael Fassbender as Jobs, Kate Winslet at his “work wife,” Seth Rogen as Steve Wozniak and Jeff Daniels as John Scully, Steve Jobs shows it’s main character minutes before three big product launches as all his personal chickens inevitably come to roost.

The first part of the film shows Steve barking at an engineer who can’t guarantee that the new Mac will be able to say “Hello” on cue, fighting over money with the mother of his first child, whose paternity he questions despite a judge ruling to the contrary, arguing with Wozniak, his friend from way back when, by refusing to acknowledge the Apple II team, whom Woz feels needs some credit, and listening to Scully impart fatherly wisdom. In Sorkin’s hands the bickering and arguing are dramatic rather than annoying. The film does convey a group of talented people coping with an egotistical talented man, who may be a genius, while asking the whether a “great” man can’t also be a good one? With Wozniak, I think the audience hopes the answer’s yes.

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The next launches we see are for the NeXT computer, which wasn’t even designed to really be sold but more as a tactic for getting back at the helm of Apple, and for iMac.

While all the performances were strong, I found both Steve Jobs’ and his illegitimate daughter Lisa, the most compelling characters. Sorkin’s story focuses on Jobs’ own feelings of rejection as an adopted child and his rejection of his first daughter as a means of explaining his personality and life. We never see his wife or other children, who apparently weren’t as interested in his launches as Lisa and her money-grubbing mother. (A bit hard to believe, but okay, it’s fictionalized, I get that.) The film ends with Steve and Lisa negotiating some stormy waters in their relationship, leaving me with the question of what role did this girl have with his other children.

All in all, it’s a compelling film, that left me with some questions. I don’t doubt that Steve Jobs was a misanthrope, but realize that this film is fictionalized to so the hero change, in a way that the real man may or may not have. It also brought home the point that Jobs wasn’t a designer, an engineer or programmer. He was a conductor, who can’t play an instrument.