Auntie Mame

I can’t think of a more vibrant, exuberant character than Auntie Mame played by Rosalind Russell.

“Live! Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!”

When young Patrick’s father dies, he’s sent to live with his vivacious Auntie Mame. Before you know it, he’s stirring the perfect martini and at a progressive school where clothing is optional. His trustee Mr. Babcock is appalled and Patrick is shipped off to a boarding school but gets to spend every holiday with his only living relative Auntie Mame, a free-spirit and free-thinker.

Sally Cato: [before a fox-hunt] Well? Shall we to the hounds?
Mame Dennis: [muttering] Yeah, I’d love to meet your family.

When the market crashes, Mame loses her fortune and takes on a variety of jobs which she botches with aplomb. All looks bleak till Game meets an oil tycoon from Texas who soon marries her after she defies his family’s efforts to ridicule her.

The film delights from start to finish. Same does face her share of slings and arrows and always faces them with courage, charm and wit. I haven’t seen this film in years and found it one of the most delightful films I’ve seen in years. I’d say this is a perfect film. I must find more of Rosalind Russell’s films, though I fear few films can match or exceed this comedic masterpiece.

Auntie Mame

Auntie-Mame

On my flight home I got to see the delightful Auntie Mame with Rosalind Russell. How did I escape this film? Well, I was born too late, that’s one reason.

The story revolves around free spirt Mame, who becomes the guardian of her nephew Patrick, who’s orphaned. She’s a smart, unconventional, vivacious woman who lives life to the fullest. When she enrolls Patrick in a school with clothing optional, the bank trustee ships him off to boarding school.

Too bad. While she’s unorthodox, she does love Patrick and there was never any signs that he’d become a danger to himself or society. He would have wound up much less of a stick in the mud if he stayed with her. Yet their relationship continues and they remain connected as Mame travels the world, marries and is soon widowed.

The film is smart, funny and entertaining. Few comedies, if any, nowadays strike the notes Auntie Mame does. It’s a real treasure.