Steve Jobs

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I knew Steve Jobs of Apple Computer fame wasn’t warm and fuzzy, but the film Steve Jobs refined my image of him. If Aaron Sorkin’s script got it right, Steve was one cold, driven man. With a superb cast including Michael Fassbender as Jobs, Kate Winslet at his “work wife,” Seth Rogen as Steve Wozniak and Jeff Daniels as John Scully, Steve Jobs shows it’s main character minutes before three big product launches as all his personal chickens inevitably come to roost.

The first part of the film shows Steve barking at an engineer who can’t guarantee that the new Mac will be able to say “Hello” on cue, fighting over money with the mother of his first child, whose paternity he questions despite a judge ruling to the contrary, arguing with Wozniak, his friend from way back when, by refusing to acknowledge the Apple II team, whom Woz feels needs some credit, and listening to Scully impart fatherly wisdom. In Sorkin’s hands the bickering and arguing are dramatic rather than annoying. The film does convey a group of talented people coping with an egotistical talented man, who may be a genius, while asking the whether a “great” man can’t also be a good one? With Wozniak, I think the audience hopes the answer’s yes.

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The next launches we see are for the NeXT computer, which wasn’t even designed to really be sold but more as a tactic for getting back at the helm of Apple, and for iMac.

While all the performances were strong, I found both Steve Jobs’ and his illegitimate daughter Lisa, the most compelling characters. Sorkin’s story focuses on Jobs’ own feelings of rejection as an adopted child and his rejection of his first daughter as a means of explaining his personality and life. We never see his wife or other children, who apparently weren’t as interested in his launches as Lisa and her money-grubbing mother. (A bit hard to believe, but okay, it’s fictionalized, I get that.) The film ends with Steve and Lisa negotiating some stormy waters in their relationship, leaving me with the question of what role did this girl have with his other children.

All in all, it’s a compelling film, that left me with some questions. I don’t doubt that Steve Jobs was a misanthrope, but realize that this film is fictionalized to so the hero change, in a way that the real man may or may not have. It also brought home the point that Jobs wasn’t a designer, an engineer or programmer. He was a conductor, who can’t play an instrument.

 

Carnage

Based on an award-winning play by Yasmina Reza, Carnage feels like a play from start to finish, but that didn’t bother me. I loved the dialog and characters and the conflict that brings them together held my attention.

Starring Jodi Foster, John C. Reilly, Kate Winslett and  Christoph Waltz, Carnage is an intelligent, often witty, slice of life drama about a power couple whose son hits the son of a more liberal, Bobo (ala Bobos in Paradise) couple. They meet to resolve the issue and while dealing with the children’s conflict, flaws in their own marriages, gender differences, pretenses and hypocrisy are exposed.

The ending disappointed me as it sort of peters out leaving a lot unsaid, which considering how given to talk all the characters were, didn’t seem fitting. Still I’m glad I spent time with these characters in a film that offered a fresh look at how we live and think.

If you like theater, you’ll probably enjoy Carnage.