One Wonderful Sunday

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Kurosawa’s 1942 ironically titled One Wonderful Sunday should be called One Looooong Sunday. It just didn’t do it for me. The film depicts two young lovers on their weekly date in post-WWII Tokyo. Inflation is sky high and the couple just have 35 yen to spend. Times are tough as the woman’s shoes have soles that flap and holes. She can’t afford a winter coat and neither can he. Since they only can meet on Sunday, I assumed they both have jobs, which they never talk about.

Masako, the woman, makes every effort to stay cheerful, while despite some upswings in mood, Yuzo, the man reminds me of Eeyore, a real downer. Yuzo always sees the downside in every situation. Masako, would you really want to marry a man whom you’re forever bolstering and cheering up? Who does so little to support you?

At one point the couple tours a model home and he just complains about the poor craftsmanship, materials and high cost. Later we see where he lives. Hovel would be too kind. On the one hand, the gap shows how out of reach a good life is for the average Japanese worker at the time, on the other it showed me that nothing would every satisfy Yuzo, which is why time and again, I wanted to tell the smiling Masako to “Run!” Find someone who isn’t so needy. While some of his depression could be due to the emotional scars of serving in the war, Masako, it could just be how this guy is and he ain’t gonna change. That he just brought 15 yen for the day, while she had 20, can be taken symbolically as well as literally.

This sums the couple up completely

This sums the couple up completely

Masako and Yuzo had no plan for the day and ended up playing baseball with some kids, buying buns when the ball hit a bun shop, viewing a model house, meeting a homeless boy, looking for an apartment, visiting the zoo, trying to get into a concert (but scalpers bought the last of the cheap seats and Yuzo started a fist fight over that, which was understandable, but counterproductive), having tea, crying — a lot, pretending to own a café. Scenes were long — really long for me. I wished to see the couple in context because I never understood what Makasako saw in Yuzo, who seemed bipolar. The scene where Misako and Yuzo pretend to own a café, imagining the bombed out wasteland to be the site of the café was powerful. A later scene at the end when Yuzo pretends to be conducting the symphony they didn’t get to see fell flat. In that scene the depressed Yuzo gives up and Masako talks directly to audience pleading with them to clap so Yuzo’s dreams return. Evidently in Japan none of the audiences clapped. I don’t blame them at all. It was time for Yuzo to pull it together or Masako to wish him well and say goodbye.

Since Japan did flourish in the decades after this, perhaps I have too much knowledge that prevents me from liking One Wonderful Sunday . This two hour film was too long for me and Yazo infuriated me.

Anatomy of a Murder

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I can’t think of a bad Jimmy Stewart movie. Director Otto Preminger’s <em>Anatomy of a Murder </em>continues Stewart’s winning streak as far as I’m concerned. With familiar old faces like Lee Remick, Ben Gazzara Orson Bean, George C. Scott, and Eve Arden, <em>Anatomy of a Murder </em> tells the story of a young soldier who’s on trial for murdering a man who allegedly raped his wife. The wife played by Remick is a saucy, flirtatious woman, who’s strangely upbeat for someone in her predicament. She calls Paul Biegler, the former D.A., who’s aimlessly spending his days fishing and doing routine legal work. She convinces him, rather easily to take the case. What follows is a game. Wherein neither Beigler nor the audience know whom to believe. While the movie’s long, and sometimes meanders like when Beigler plays piano with Duke Ellington at a roadhouse, it’s an entertaining, absorbing ride, that surprises at the very end.

I was left intrigued, as was Beigler, at the very end. The cast is strong and the story compelling.