Lucky Me

As Doris Day just passed away at the age of 97, I figured watching some of her films would be a good memorial. My library displayed their DVDs with Day and I chose Lucky Day at random.

In Lucky Me, Day plays Candy Williams an aspiring singer and dancer who’s very superstitious and won’t walk by a black cat or step on a crack. Any superstition you’ve heard of in America, she won’t test. Williams is part of a struggling troupe of performers led by Phil Silvers, who’s perfect for his part. Candy gets duped by a well-meaning composer and romantic comedy ensues.

Though Lucky Me isn’t Day’s finest film and there are no great classic songs I recognized, the film entertains. It’s a cheerful story which showcases Day’s optimistic style. It’s sure to make you smile. The supporting cast includes Nancy Walker, who I remember from the sitcom Rhoda. Walker’s dancing skill was a nice surprise and Silver was a wonderful father figure in this tale of old showbiz.

The Big Short

bigshort
Based on Michael Lewis’ book, starring Steve Carell, Brad Pitt, Christian Bale and Ryan Gosling, The Big Short tells the story of the man who figured out the U.S. housing market was a house of cards and the others who learned about it and bet (invested) the market would collapse. It’s an interesting story though now anyone who follows the news knows what happened and why.

I liked the main narrative, but found the montages ineffective. These were interspersed showed the era through random images shot with a shaky hand, which was no doubt imagined to be “cool.” The director aimed to be artsy with these and I think failed. Just tell us the story in as compelling a way as possible.

The story’s sort of a cat and mouse plot, with three teams of investors tracking the source of the financial crisis and even though they bet big, I found myself rooting for them. I wonder whether generations hence would. The film does bring up the question of their hypocrisy, which is a fair question and needed to be asked.

Although I doubt the filmmakers realized that while their film indicts the greedy on Wall Street, it implicitly indicts all swaggering, men who lack a code of honor or morality. What we see is a male-dominated field with no true oversight who spend way too much time joking around, teasing each other. The film, probably made by a boys’ club, puts strippers or “bathing beauties” in a scene whenever they could. I left the theater angry that only one man went to jail for causing the crisis, that we could still have a similar crisis as we don’t have new regulations that can prevent it, and that Hollywood is yet another male-dominated field that doesn’t serve society as it could.

I could have done without the gratuitous strippers and a clearer narrative, but I’d still say it’s worth seeing, though perhaps it’s better to read the book.