Executive Suite

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Executive Suite is as relevant today as it was when it was released in 1954. Directed by Robert Wise, Executive Suite begins with Avery Bullard, Tredway Co. president, whom we never see, calling a last minute meeting and then suddenly dropping dead on the street. From a skyscraper’s window one of the executives sees Bullard’s body on the street and plans to cash in. He immediately places a short sale on company stock that he doesn’t have the funds to pay for.

Bullard was legendary, but had no succession plan. He turned the struggling furniture company around but has let it go stagnant recently. He’s been romancing the founder’s daughter, played by Barbara Stanwyck, but recently has been ignoring her. It seems he’s checked out are relied on prior charm and expertise and has been coasting.

As Bullard’s i.d. was missing it took a while to identify the body. Once they do, the executives now must vote for a new president. Shaw, the numbers man, wants the post and begins to persuade his colleagues to vote for him. Blackmail is not beyond him. Good guy, who’s in the design and development division, McDonald Walling is played by William Holden.

Also starring June Allyson, Frederick March, and Shelley Winters, Executive Suite addresses relevant concerns like corporate vision, responsibility to workers and the duty to create quality products at a fair price.

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The Bridge over the River Kwai

How did I miss this one? I just finished watching the classic The Bridge over the River Kwai starring William Holden and Alec Guinness. I’m blown away. Every scene was perfect in this story of Holden’s Shale, a jaded American officer who’s at odds with Guinness’ a British commander’s absolute, unstinting adoration of following codes and rules.

I remember the whistling and the powerful ending from my childhood. I was no more than 6 and annoyed at a family party where all the adults were enthralled by this film. Now I appreciate why as Holden and Guinness deliver perfect performances in these two characters, who couldn’t be more different. They’re conflicts aren’t direct as they’re rarely in the same scenes, but they’re central to the film’s theme.

Both characters are prisoners of war in a Japanese camp run by the brutal Satoo who must get a bridge built in a few weeks. The work is far behind schedule. Satoo operates on the Japanese ancient military code of Bushidoo. which runs contrary to the Geneva Convention, which Guinness insists upon. Guinness shows his dedication to duty when he refuses to let his officers work on the bridge. He’s willing to spend days in a metal box, called the “Oven” to stand up for this belief. You have to admire his courage.

Holden’s Shale looks for short cuts and sees the futility of the war. He has his points, but neither character is clearly right or wrong, which is the key to why the film is so absorbing.

(I wonder how my students would view this film which shows the Japanese as cruel not just to the Chinese, but to the Allied soldiers. I wouldn’t show it because I don’t want to spread anti-Japanese sentiment, which made sense in the early part of the 20th century, but is outmoded now.)

Forever Female

After seeing Monkey Business last week, Netflix recommended Forever Female with Ginger Rogers as a successful actress smitten with a younger playwright, played my William Holden. Anxious to write professionally and give up his job at the fruit market, Holden agrees to altar his play so that Rogers can play the lead. In the original the lead is a 19 year old woman, but Holden gets convinced that the pay will work better with a 29 year old, the oldest age Rogers’ character’s willing to admit to.

To complicate matters, there’s a young 19 year old starlet who changes her name ever week and half it seems who’s convinced she should play the lead and Holden was made for her.

It’s a fun film, light and witty. Not a must see, but enjoyable.