Guys and Dolls

Last weekend I got to see Northwestern University’s production of Guys & Dolls. Though I knew the name and some of the big numbers like “Luck Be a Lady Tonight” and “A Bushel ‘n’ a Peck,” I hadn’t seen the show and wasn’t clear on the storyline. First performed in 1950, Guys & Dolls is set in New York City and follows a bunch of gamblers who cross paths with some Salvation Army types. Gangster Nathan Detroit, who’s been engaged to his sweetheart Adelaide for 14 years, needs to find a site for his floating crap game, but as the cops are on to him, he’s got no takers. The Biltmore Garage is possible, but the manager wants a hefty deposit for his troubles.

Nathan is sure he can convince gambler Sky Masterson to bet that Sky can take Save-A-Soul Sergeant Sarah Brown to Cuba. That’s a sure thing as A) Sky will bet on anything and B) Sarah is far to holy to agree to a date.

What follows is a lot of toe-tapping music, unlikely romance, and the antics of small time criminals.

The Northwestern performers all had great voice and sure steps. When I saw all the steep steps on the stage, I was amazed that no one took a tumble. How the girls in their heels managed, I’ll never know. Certainly they have more grace than I do.

The casting was excellent, with one exception. I applaud them for color blind casting and having the two lead women be African American. The numbers where some men were cast as chorus girls was funny. The one thing that I found a distraction was that Sky Masterson was played by a woman. It wasn’t that they made Sky and Sarah a same sex couple, It was that they expected the audience to buy into a very feminine woman with classic long blonde hair and feminine make up, to be considered a 1940s man. My friend and I both had trouble buying that choice. I’d have done some color blind casting for Sky.

The play is a lot of fun, but hasn’t aged all that well. It’s clear that for the women, their life goal is to be a stay at home wife. Though Adelaide works as a showgirl and Sarah is a missionary, their goal is to marry and stop working. Also, it’s clear that the norm for women is to find a man and then go to work changing him for the benefit of society. Now we realize that it’s better to find someone whose character you like as is since changing someone is a difficult if not impossible job.

Nonetheless, I recommend if you’re anywhere near Evanston, IL from now till March 3, check out Guys & Dolls.

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The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer

Starring Cary Grant, Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple, The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer is a musing light entertainment. Temple has transformed from the cute dancing girl to a beautiful young woman, though in this case a very fanciful romantic, named Susan. Loy plays Margaret a judge who’s Susan’s sister and guardian. At the start we see that Susan represents the epitome of teenage energy and foolishness. Her goals change weekly every time the high school has a different guest speaker. Susan sees herself as sophisticated and is blind to her own foolishness. Margaret tries to discipline her with grace, wisdom and kindness.

As the film starts Margaret is off to court to preside over the case of Dick Nugent, a debonair bachelor who’s accused of causing a disturbance at a night club. Of course, you’ve guessed that Grant is the bachelor. He arrives to the courtroom late and strikes Margaret as callow and annoying, but hardly a menace so he’s cleared and let off with a warning.

Next Nugent heads to the high school where he’s this week’s career speaker. An artist, Nugent enthralls the female students with his idealistic presentation. Susan is especially swept off her feet and hallucinates that Nugent is actually wearing a gleaming suit of armor. Before we know it, Susan is sneaking into Nugent’s apartment. Today we’d say she was stalking him, but in this farce things never get that dark.

If you’re looking for a light amusing film full of clever banter, sophisticated costumes and outlandish physical humor, you’ll enjoy The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer.

Gayle

A colleague at my new job suggested I watch Chris Fleming as Gayle Waters Waters on a comedy show on YouTube. It’s an outlandish look at upper middle class suburbia. Enjoy.

I’m impressed with the how entertaining this show is when there’s no studio or big budget. The humor isn’t cookie cutter. It’s also not G rated. They don’t swear, but there are some risqué comments.

Gold Diggers of 1933

“We’re in the Money” is just one of the memorable tunes in Gold Diggers of 1933 is a romantic comedy about some dancers whose show gets nixed because the producer couldn’t pay his bills. Next they’re seen shivering in their beds unwilling to get up as it’s easier to starve in bed.

Soon the producer comes to their apartment and hears their talented piano playing neighbor. He convinces Brad, the piano player to write some songs for his new show which will be a smash, if he can just get the funds. Brad, who’s sweet on one of the dancers, turns out to be a rich boy and he finances the show. When the male lead falls sick, Brad must go on and his true identity is revealed, which leads to family interference in his love life. In response to his brother’s meddling the other dancers pretend to be money grubbers to teach him a lesson.

It’s a light-hearted romp, that entertains, unless you judge past eras for their gender stereotypes. The most surprising part of the film was the closing number, “Remember My Forgotten Man” a tribute to the men who served in WWI and whose lives were ruined as a result.

You Were Never Lovelier

Starring Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth, You Were Never Lovelier is good light entertainment. Astaire plays Robert, a New York dancer who’s gone to Buenos Aires and wants to work at a a night club that’s owned by a man who’s got four daughters. The first daughter is married and soon never seen again. The second daughter is in no hurry to marry but her two younger daughters have secret fiancés lined up. However, the father just finds Astaire to be

Dear old dad decides that he’ll write mysterious love letters to Maria, daughter #2. He has no idea how this game will end or actually give her daughter long time happiness. Maria does get swept off her feet by the romantic letters and mistakenly assumes Robert has been writing the letters. A typical 1940s plot unfolds. Rita shines and Astaire is Astaire. They both dance wonderfully and the costumes are dazzling. Yes, the story is far fetched and the jokes rather corny, but the film is fun.

The song’s lyrics aren’t the best. Some rhymes are forced, but I was entertained.

Trivia

Astaire once said that his favorite dance partner was Rita Hayworth. He said that if she was taught a complicated dance in the morning, she’d have it down by lunch.