12 Days of Christmas Stories, #4

Doctor Who Last Christmas is an outstanding episode, that’s funny, mind-bending, and emotionally satisfying. It delivers smart science-fi that makes you think about our dreams and our dreams within dreams. We see Clara missing her boyfriend Danny, who had died (I haven’t seen that episode. I’m quite behind in my Doctor Who viewing. As usual Peter Capaldi is a frantic, whip smart and yet annoying Doctor, who usually makes a good point when you think about it.

It’s got the gross monstrous villains you expect. The twists and turns that make the plot unpredictable and moments between Clara and Danny and the Doctor and Clara that provide emotion that’s more real than what’s on a lot of television. It does a lot of questioning our dream states that was compelling.

Oh, and Santa, Santa and elves with attitude and smarts feature prominently.

You can find it on Amazon or DVD. Give it a watch!

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White Christmas

There’s something about old musicals that’s so uplifting. I’ve seen White Christmas a few times, the best viewing was on Saturday at Chicago’s Music Box Theater with all the surrounding fanfare: Santa, jingle bells, carolers and organist.

The film probably wouldn’t be made today. The script would be rejected. It’s not a dark or edgy film. There’s no desperation. No here characters are perfect, but they all have spunk and hope, which is why by the end of the film, I left the theater filled with cheer.

It’s the story of two nightclub singers played by Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye. They served in WWII together when Kaye saved Crosby’s life. Thus no matter how annoying, Crosby can’t shake the whimsical Kaye, who’s forever getting sensible Wallace into complicated, embarrassing situations.

The pair meet a pair of sisters, played by Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen who’re trying to scale the ladder into showbiz. They’re talented, but are just starting out. The younger sister schemes to get the famous Wallace and Davis (Crosby and Kaye’s characters). Both Crosby and Kaye are enamored with a sister, but you know romance will not be easy.

The crux of the story revolves around the plight of Wallace and Davis’ old general, who owns a failing Vermont Inn. The general feels like a failure and misses his army camaraderie and success. No one’s coming to the inn because there’s no snow for skiing. Soon Wallace and Davis get the sisters to help them change the general’s fate.

The characters all had a lot of elegance and style. The costumes were bright and well tailored. They spoke with rhythm and intelligence. There’s no offensive language or swearing. I think all of these things contribute to how good the film makes people feel.

The film has great music and dancing. The jokes, often corny, made me laugh.

Try to find time for White Christmas this holiday. Introduce a younger relative to this cheerful film. Pray Hollywood finds a way to make more films like White Christmas. Not all films need to be cheery, but how about a few new ones that are?

Hopscotch

hopscotch mixed

Starring Walter Matthau, Glenda Jackson, Sam Waterson and Ned Beatty, Hopscotch (1980) entertains with wry, sometimes corny humor and a clever cat and mouse plot. Matthau plays Kendig, a top CIA operative who bugs the big boss and plays by his own rules. Beatty plays the big boss who intends to place Kendig in a desk job till he retires. Kendig won’t have it. He shreds his personnel file and goes on the run. His first stop is to meet Isobel, his lover from way back when. There’s plenty of witty repartee between them. Isobel often plays the mother to Kendig’s naughty boy, but underneath her stern façade Isobel thoroughly enjoys Kendig’s antics.

Beatty plays Myerson, the consummate manager, who has no imagination and follows everything by the book. He’s certainly a stereotype, but as the movie hops along and a good clip, I didn’t mind. The film’s aim is to entertain, nothing more.

Sam Waterson plays Cutter, a fan of Kendig, who’ll take his mentor’s job and who’s sent to track down Kendig. Cutter admires Kendig and doesn’t feel Kendig deserves a desk, but he follows orders and hops around Europe and the U.S. trying to catch Kendig.

The ending provides a nice surprise, and though some of the dialog now seems stilted. It’s a shock that a few decades ago Hopscotch got an R rating. Now you’d hear the few profanities and see the little love scenes on TV during what was the “Family Hour.”

I liked how Kendig represented the experienced, skilled older professional who’s value is undervalued.

Do You See Me?

The Italian comedy Do You See Me? looks at the difficulties a talented female architect faces when after succeeding around the world, she decides to return to Italy where she’s lucky to get a low paying waitress job. While Serena Bruno has graduated from top schools and won awards for her work, back in Italy the economy’s tight and jobs, particularly for women, are scarce.

Serena Bruno first is attracted to and then when she learns he’s gay, she befriends the owner of the restaurant where she works. He sees her talent and intelligence when no one else does. He encourages her to enter an architecture contest to redesign a public housing space. Though her idea, which was inspired by input from the residents, is fantastic she fears she’ll be passed over for a man so when the committee mistakes her for a secretary to Bruno Serena she plays along. She convinces her former boss, now friend and roommate to pretend to be Bruno Serena. Comedy ensues and while the situation is ridiculous, it’s a thoughtful, fun film that doesn’t insult the audience’s intelligence.

It’s an enjoyable film that depicts the difficulties woman still face.

The Privilege Game

I thin there is some truth here and that it’s good to laugh at such topics. I don’t think that makes one a racist or oppressor. Some will disagree.

Thoughts/ Opinions?

Seven Minutes in Heaven

Seven Minutes in Heaven with Mike O’Brien is a goofy series of YouTube Videos that feature actual celebrities.

Yep, this guy just tapes in a closet with celebrities. A kiss is at least attempted with every guest.

Patricia Clarkson found time for giggling in the closet.

Amy Poehler had to gargle after the kiss attempt.