Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

20
Sep
17

Chinese Traditional Markets

I’ve taken loads of photos of traditional markets in China and I’m sure to post more. This video has a Chinese woman explaining the ins and outs of shopping in these markets.

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14
Sep
17

Adam Ruins Fine Art

This made my blood boil.

30
Aug
17

Adam Ruins Student Loans

As you return to school and classes.

27
Aug
17

Hopscotch

hopscotch mixed

Starring Walter Matthau, Glenda Jackson, Sam Waterson and Ned Beatty, Hopscotch (1980) entertains with wry, sometimes corny humor and a clever cat and mouse plot. Matthau plays Kendig, a top CIA operative who bugs the big boss and plays by his own rules. Beatty plays the big boss who intends to place Kendig in a desk job till he retires. Kendig won’t have it. He shreds his personnel file and goes on the run. His first stop is to meet Isobel, his lover from way back when. There’s plenty of witty repartee between them. Isobel often plays the mother to Kendig’s naughty boy, but underneath her stern façade Isobel thoroughly enjoys Kendig’s antics.

Beatty plays Myerson, the consummate manager, who has no imagination and follows everything by the book. He’s certainly a stereotype, but as the movie hops along and a good clip, I didn’t mind. The film’s aim is to entertain, nothing more.

Sam Waterson plays Cutter, a fan of Kendig, who’ll take his mentor’s job and who’s sent to track down Kendig. Cutter admires Kendig and doesn’t feel Kendig deserves a desk, but he follows orders and hops around Europe and the U.S. trying to catch Kendig.

The ending provides a nice surprise, and though some of the dialog now seems stilted. It’s a shock that a few decades ago Hopscotch got an R rating. Now you’d hear the few profanities and see the little love scenes on TV during what was the “Family Hour.”

I liked how Kendig represented the experienced, skilled older professional who’s value is undervalued.

25
Aug
17

Find of the Week: Snazzy Labs

I’ve discovered a helpful YouTube channel for anyone with a computer that they want to use better or to fix. Focusing on Macs, Snazzy Labs offers helpful information to make using a computer more fun or efficient.

Check it out!

 

20
Aug
17

March Comes in Like a Lion . . .

march lion

Based on a popular manga series, March Comes in Like a Lion and it’s sequel March Goes Out Like a Lamb takes viewers inside the world of shoji, Japanese chess.

Orphaned at 8 years old when a car accident kills his parents and sister, Rei Kiriyama is adopted by his father’s friend, who’s a competitive shoji player. The only way to get love or at least attention in the house is through shoji. Red soon proves to have a knack for the game, which is a mixed blessing because his adoptive sister and brother become hostile towards him when he beats them and they can’t take it.

Rei’s talent leads to his winning and becoming pro before he graduates high school. With his winnings he’s able to support himself and move out. Yet his evil step sister hounds him like a vicious ghost who won’t go away no matter where Rei tries to run.

Rei is soon taken in by three sisters who’ve lost their parents. The girls and their grandfather run a traditional sweet shop and provide the warm family life Rei craves.

The story does not require knowledge of the rules or ins and outs of shoji.I know nothing of the game, but did get caught up in the competition as Rei strives to dethrone the champion, an adulterous egotist that his stepsister has been dating.

19
Aug
17

I Will Buy You

I-Will-Buy-You

Kishimoto and the player’s girlfriend

A social critique of post WWII Japan, I Will Buy You shows how baseball became corrupted and how athletes became commodities in the 1950s. Directed by Masaki Kobayashi, I Will Buy You shows the machinations surrounding a college baseball superstar’s entry to pro sports. The story focuses on Kishimoto, a driven scout who’s hellbent on signing Kurita, a hot college hitter. To do this he needs to woo Kurita’s greedy family, his girlfriend who’s leery of the materialism that’s taken over Japan and finally his deceptive, self-centered mentor.

buy you

Kishimoto (right) with his boss

I Will Buy You is in the shomin-geki genre, which consists of dramas about the problems of ordinary society. Here Kobayashi takes on the world of Japan’s most cherished sport, baseball. (I had a student who insisted that the Japanese invented baseball.) Kobayashi brilliantly challenges viewers to see how calculating, conniving and avaricious it’s become.

People think the Japanese are oblique and indirect, but in I Will Buy You characters are explicit in what they want and how they feel about Kurita, who’s rarely on screen and he’s objectified like no other film character I can think of.

The film had a compelling story and covered sports in a way an American film wouldn’t. The end surprised me. With so many characters standing in the shadows, the masterful cinematography reminded me of film noir minus the murder or crime.




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